Using a labradoodle for hunting Why do Labradoodles Dig

Using a labradoodle for hunting

Do you like going hunting once in a while. Do you have, or do you plan on getting a labradoodle, and have wondered if it is viable for hunting.

Using a labradoodle for hunting is very much possible. Some types of prey it is excellent for, others not so much. Here’s what I’ve learned about hunting with a labradoodle.

In a previous post I briefly touched upon the subject of hunting with a labradoodle. This time I want to go a bit more into detail what I have learned while studying the subject a bit more these last few months.

Labradoodle origins

To understand why a labradoodle makes a good hunting dog, we have to take a look at where the breed originates from.

A labradoodle is a so-called designer dog. They were created when the Royal Guide Dog Association of Australia wanted to create an allergy-friendly guide dog.

There are several different types of doodles. But the two most commonly known are Golden-doodles and Labradoodles.

What they have in common, is that one of the parents is a poodle. And a first generation labradoodle is a mix of a Labrador Retriever and a Poodle.

The first generation labradoodle is also known as a F1. They will usually be quite large, and these dogs usually sheds.

Labrador Retrievers

Different colors of a Labrador Retriever

The Labrador retriever originates from Newfoundland in Canada, where different types of retriever dogs were mixed with the Newfoundland dog.

The mission was to create a breed of dog that was as sturdy and hardworking as the Newfoundland dog, but more sporty and agile.

It was originally used by fishermen to help pull the fishing nets onto the shore. This eventually led the dog to the seaport of Poole in Dorset, England.

Here it was quickly discovered that the breed also had some excellent skills for retrieving swimming birds.

The Labrador Retriever is one of the most frequently used hunting dogs, and it, as the name reveals, loves to retrieve items.

Not only sticks and toys hiding in the backyard of a house, but also birds and ducks.

This love for exploring and retrieving also means that the Labrador Retriever is one of the most popular dogs in the military and the police.

And they also make for excellent guide dogs for blind or otherwise handicapped people.

Poodles

Poodles also love retrieving.

Like the Labrador Retriever, Poodles also love to retrieve items.

The poodle is a highly intelligent and easy to train breed.

The original origin of poodles are somewhat discussed. Some experts believe they originate from France. Others that they are from Russia or Germany.

But most experts agree that it was the french that further developed the poodle into the type of dog it is now.

The Poodle was originally used mostly as a retriever dog, before people fell in love with its looks, and turned it into a circus dog or pet for wealthy families.

One of the reasons why the poodle was so popular in the circus, was because of their intelligence. They could be taught pretty much anything you could imagine a dog doing.

It is also a very flexible and agile dog, and willing to complete any task with the hope of getting a treat in return.

These are also some of the reasons why it was originally an excellent hunting dog.

Even though it through the years has been turned into more of a family dog than a hunting dog, the Poodle hasn’t forgotten its instincts as a hunting dog.

They are also filled with energy, and can easy become restless if they don’t have any form of outlet for that energy.

So taking it hunting every once in a while is a great idea to release some of the steam.

Labradoodles for hunting

When you then combine the different types you get some genetic skills that are excellent for hunting.

You have both the love for retrieving in both types of dog.

The agility, speed and power from a Labrador Retriever. And the intelligence and nimbleness of a Poodle.

Of course it differs exactly what skills are prominent in your own dog, but the basics for a good hunting dog is in all Labradoodles.

Training tips for hunting with a Labradoodle

As with any dog, it’s important to teach it the most basic skills for hunting. And some of those skills are also equally great for everyday use.

Basic commands like “sit”, “stay”, “come”, “heel” etc. are always great. But also commands such as “look” and “freeze” can be of value at home with the family.

You might also later decide to take the labradoodle for a field trial where they allow non purebreed hunting dogs.

Here, skills like “line of site retrieving” and “left/right/backcasting” will be tested.

It doesn’t just have to be physical training that you do with your labradoodle. Of course, it is always a good idea to give it atleast 30 min – 1 hour of physical exercise each day, but mental training is also very important.

Labradoodles are smart dogs and require to also be challenged on it’s intelligence.

If you want to learn a bit more about training the brain of your dog, take a look at this training course (affiliate link) created by Adrienne Farricelli, who has been featured in quite a few places with her unique methods for training your dog’s intelligence.

But if you are really serious about training your Labradoodle for hunting, go check out other sources on the web which specifies in just that field of training.

This page is aimed as training retrievers, and is also perfect for labradoodles.

I don’t plan on using my own Labradoodle for hunting, so it is not something I will claim really be into the specifics about!

Final words

All it really required for a labradoodle to become a great hunting dog is the same thing as is required from the most widely used hunting dogs – training and patience. Be that both mentally and physcially.

They talents are for sure already in the genes of the dog, and with enough training and exercise your dog will be an excellent partner if you’re out hunting birds or ducks.

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